Tag Archives: multiple sclerosis

Invisible Illness: Searching for a Cure

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Invisible Illness Week

Total Eye Care will be conducting clinical trials for patients with dysautonomia, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, and multiple sclerosis. As a part of the study, participants will receive an eye exam at no charge. Currently, we still have some openings for patients with relapsing remitting MS. If you would like to be a part of the study please contact us at Clinical_Trials@Prettyill.com.

Dr. Diana Opens Her New Website for the Chronically Ill

Dr. Diana Driscoll PhotoIt’s been in the works for a couple months now, Dr. Diana’s new website www.PrettyIll.com is now live. Check it out. I think you all will be really impressed by all of the information available there with much more information still to come. The website will feature information, mostly in video format, for patients facing chronic illness such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Multiple Sclerosis, Postural Orthostatic Hypertension and Dysautonomia to name a few.

The PrettyIll.com website will also be the hub for a number of studies that Dr. Diana is starting. The first of which is Vascular Fundus Changes in Patients With High Probability of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency, a study that is being done at Total Eye Care. The second study is Head Circumference Growth in Children with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Who Develop Dysautonomia later in life. There are other future studies planned as well. I hope you check out the new site and leave a comment!

Total Eye Care to Conduct Fundus Vascular Abnormalities Study

We are very pleased to announce that Total Eye Care will start its first clinical study next month. The title of the study is Vascular Fundus Changes in Patients With High Probability of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency. Check out the video below for more information. We are recruiting patients with either Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome or Multiple Sclerosis so please spread the word. The video has a lot of good information on the study so please do check it out.

Does Flax Seed Oil Have a Role in the Treatment of Dry Eye Syndrome

For strict dietary vegans flax meal may be the only option of increasing the omega 3 fatty acids, albeit an inefficient one. However, for most people flax seed oil’s role is very limited in the treatment of dry eye syndrome. Flax seed meal on the other hand may have a limited role. The biggest disadvantages to using flax seed oil is that you can’t cook with it (it is not stable above 160° F), it must be refrigerated and it has a short shelf life. Flax seed meal, on the other, hand can be used as a shortening substitute, has a very high fiber content, has a much longer shelf life and can be used in baking. Therefore, I would only recommend flax seed oil over omega 3 fatty acids derived from fish if someone did not like the texture of the flax seed meal or flax meal would be inappropriate in a particular recipe.

One of the best uses of flax seed meal is its high fiber content therefore, I would recommend flax seed meal in baking to increase our dietary fiber and any ALA (alpha linolenic acid) converted to the omega fatty acids is just an extra bonus. In addition, flax seeds are not digested by our bodies and should not be considered as a dietary source of fiber or omega 3 fatty acids. The flax seed’s shell is very hard and must be crushed if our bodies are to utilize it. Therefore, if you must rely on flax as a source of omega 3 fatty acids utilize flax seed meal.

This article is the fourth and final article in a series on Omega 3 fatty acids in the treatment of dry eye syndrome.

Which is a Better Source of Omega 3 Fatty Acids Fish Oil or Flax Seed Meal

The short answer, without question is fish oil. We have found better results by eliminating the flax seed oil and greatly increasing the EPA and DHA (we like 2000 mg to 3000 mg of EPA and DHA combined). Flax seed oil is very unstable and thus has a short shelf life at room temperature. Flax seed oil also does not contain omega 3 fatty acids, instead our bodies must convert the ALA (alpha linolenic acid) contained within the flax seed into the omega 3 fatty acids that can then be used by our bodies. Another disadvantage to flax seed oil is that our body’s conversion of flax seed oil to EPA or DHA is very inefficient. The conversion ALA to EPA/DHA rate has been reported to be between 4% and 15% (worse for DHA than EPA and lower for men than women). A person’s conversion rate can vary based on many factors. Therefore, fish is a much better and efficient source of omega 3 fatty acids.

This article is the third in the four part series on using omega 3 fatty acids in treating dry eye syndrome

Selecting the Right Fish Oil Capsule for Dry Eye Relief

As eye doctors we recommend that our patients with dry eyes increase their dietary intake of omega 3 fatty acids. Our typical dosage is 2000 mg to 3000 mg in a combination of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). This translates into 4 oz of wild, Atlantic salmon per day. Regardless of how much we like salmon we probably don’t want it every day no matter how many different ways there are to fix it, therefore fish oil capsules are a necessary dietary supplement. Unfortunately, not all fish oil capsules are created equal. Often inferior and/or low dose varieties cause “fish burp” and indigestion while others can not be efficiently used by our bodies. Here is an article on how to evaluate the different types of omega 3 fish oil capsules.

This article is the second of a four part series on using omega 3 fatty acids in treating dry eye syndrome