Category Archives: Eye Lids

Patient Reports Great Results Latisse™

A patient stopped by the office today to show me her new eyelashes.  I must say they were quite impressive, and more importantly ….. she loves them.  Before we started her on Latisse™ four months ago her eyelashes were short, thin and intermittent.  Well, no longer they now look great.  She had to cut back on the Latisse™ from every night to 3 or 4 nights a week, because they were too long!

Gorgeous Eyelashes are Only a Drop Away

Before Latisse and after 16 weeks

Available Now at Total Eye Care, a Non Surgical Treatment for Beautiful Eyelashes.

Latisse™ is a prescription medication that makes your very own lashes longer, thicker and fuller.   Latisse™ is 0.03% Bimatoprost, which is the same active ingredient as Allergan’s glaucoma medication, Lumigan™.   Doctors found that one of the side effects of Lumigan™ was an increase in the darkness, thickness, length and number of eyelashes.  Lumigan™, a prescription eye medication not a cosmetic, grew impressive eyelashes in men and women alike.

Originally, Latisse™ was intended to be used in the treatment of hypotrichosis (the medical term for inadequate or insufficient eyelashes) in cancer patients that had lost their eyelashes while undergoing chemotherapy or radiation, but has now been approved by the FDA as an eyelash beautifier.

Visit the Total Eye Care Latisse™ Information Center for more before and after photos and links to schedule a consultation to see if Latisse™ is right for you.

FDA Approves Latisse for the Treatment of Hypotrichosis of the Eyelashes

It’s official, as we reported a little over 2 weeks ago about pending approval of LATISSE(TM) to increase the length, number and darkness of a patient’s eyelashes Allergan made the announcement today that the FDA approved LATISSE(TM) (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution 0.03%), allowing it to be prescribed by doctors.

Available only through a doctor, LATISSE(TM) is a once-daily prescription treatment applied to the base of the upper eyelashes with a sterile, single-use-per-eye disposable applicator. LATISSE(TM) users can expect to experience longer, fuller and darker eyelashes in as little as eight weeks, with full results in 16 weeks. To maintain effect, continued treatment with LATISSE(TM) is required. If use of LATISSE(TM) is discontinued, eyelashes will gradually return to where they were prior to treatment over a period of weeks to months (average eyelash hair cycle).

LATISSE(TM) will be available in the United States by prescription only and is subject to all U.S. guidelines applicable to dispensing a prescription product. Based on today’s FDA approval, Allergan expects to launch the product nationwide in the first quarter of 2009.

In studies LATISSE(TM) was well tolerated with the most commonly reported adverse events being non-serious and cosmetic in nature. Common adverse events observed in the clinical trial included eye redness (3.6%), itchy eyes (3.6%) and skin hyperpigmentation (2.9%).  LATISSE(TM) use may cause darkening of the eyelid skin which may be reversible. Although not reported in clinical studies, LATISSE(TM) use may also cause increased brown pigmentation of the colored part of the eye which is likely to be permanent.

FDA Nears Approval of Eyelash Lengthening Drug

Allergan, Inc. the maker of Lumigan, a medication we currently use to lower the intra-ocular pressure in patients with

Photo, Lumigan ophthalmic solution

Photo, Lumigan ophthalmic solution

glaucoma, is expected to receive approval to market Lumigan to patients that wish to lengthen and thicken their eyelashes.  Lumigan is a popular drug for the treatment of glaucoma.  A side affect of Lumigan is that of thickening and lengthening the eyelashes.  Patients often ask us if there is a way to make their eyelases longer and thicker.  The answer was always yes but it’s not approved for that purpose.

The “new drug” will be called Latisse (Bimatoprost Solution 0.03%) and is pending approval for the treatment of hypotrichosis of the eyelashes (reduced amount of hair).  Latisse will cause an increase in the number, thickness and darkness of the eyelashes.  Unlike Lumigan it is not intended to go directly into the eye, but rather on the eyelashes.  Allergan expects to begin marketing Latisse in 2009.

As a side note a few years ago a patient brought a product from the Jan Marini line of skin care products into the office.  The company claimed the product contained a drug that caused the eyelashes to lengthen.  Not long after that the FDA forced it off the market.  I’m glad to see an alternative is just around the corner.

The FDA approves LATISSE(TM) December 26, 2008, read about it here.

Q: I keep getting these bumps on my eyelids. I’ve been told they are styes, but why do they keep coming back?

A: Styes are red, painful bumps on the eyelid and are chronic problems for many patients.  Styes are caused when the glands along the lid margin become clogged and infected, much like a pimple on our face.  Some patients are more susceptible to the recurrence of styes because they may have blepharitis, a common lid condition.

If you notice a small lump on your eyelid it is best to see your eye doctor as soon as possible.  The longer the treatment is delayed the longer it will take to resolve it and the more painful it becomes.  If a stye is not treated promptly or is very large a lump may remain.  These lumps (the medical term is chalazion) can be left alone or they may be removed surgically for aesthetic reasons.

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Q: Why are my eyes so dry lately?

A: Many conditions can contribute to dry eyes, including both your health and your, environment. Are you near any ceiling fans or heaters? Does your car’s heater or air conditioner blow directly on your eyes? Some medications, such as antihistamines, decongestants and diuretics can also contribute to dryness. Hormone changes, such as those attributed to pregnancy or menopause may also be a factor. Some people have a condition called blepharitis, where their lids become dry and flaky, this too can contribute to dryness. Other people may be suffering with “Sjogren’s Syndrome”, which is an autoimmune disorder where the mucous membrane glands are attacked causing significant dryness and discomfort.

Your optometrist can evaluate the source of your dry eyes and initiate a treatment plan. Dry eye syndrome is very common and can be successfully treated. In addition to eye drops there are many new solutions for the treatment of dry eyes that don’t require the use of eye drops.